Posts Tagged ‘Grow’

Seeds From Grow

The Grow Seed Exchange brought about some seed shar­ing at the Creek­side Com­muntiy Cen­tre. If you hap­pen to be the hap­py recip­i­ent of one of the Grow seed pack­ages but don’t know a lot about plant­i­ng and grow­ing the seeds look for details below.


Grow Walk

Please join Jason Pack­er, sus­tain­abil­i­ty con­sul­tant with Rec­ol­lec­tive for a live­ly walk through the Olympic Vil­lage. Jason will dis­cuss the green fea­tures of the devel­op­ment and how these inno­va­tions reflect the chang­ing land­scape of sus­tain­able design. How can sus­tain­abil­i­ty be built into our urban envi­ron­ments and enact­ed in every­day life will be explored in this walk­ing dialogue.


Swarming

The evening of the Swarm 12 event was pret­ty spec­tac­u­lar. The weath­er was beau­ti­ful and the sun­set on the water incredible.

Alexan­der McNaughton local urban farmer, wild for­ager and cat about town pre­pared and served some fresh sam­ples of organ­ic food from the local foodshed.


Grow Seed Exchange

The nights are get­ting dark­er, the days crisper and the leaves are start­ing to turn. As fall is now here, we want­ed to take a moment to acknowl­edge the hard work and effort of all the peo­ple that con­tributed to Grow with a spe­cial event called the Seed Exchange.


The Bug Lady

Maria Keat­ing, an ento­mol­o­gist with City Farmer came by for lunch on Fri­day. She brought a bas­ket of car­niv­o­rous plants and her exten­sive knowl­edge about plant/insect/human relations.


Mason Bees at the Bulkhead

Mason Bees are a native pol­li­na­tor to BC. Unlike hon­ey bees they are soli­tary so they don’t live in hives and pro­duce hon­ey. To nest they seek out holes in wood where they can lay their eggs. Typ­i­cally a Mason Bee would find holes pro­duced by wood­peck­ers, but this form of habi­tat can be cre­ated to attract Mason Bees to cer­tain areas for increased pollination.


Green Graffiti with EYA

Kristi­na Parusel from the Envi­ron­men­tal Youth Alliance met with me on Fri­day to help build a small-scale liv­ing wall at the Bulk­head. The liv­ing walls are part of the EYA Green Graf­fiti pro­gram which takes urban agri­cul­ture ver­ti­cal. Using an alu­minum unit that con­tains 24, 6″ x 6″ cubes, fruit, veg­eta­bles and herbs can be grown. I was sur­prised when Kristi­na told me that they’ve suc­cess­fully grown toma­toes, beets and cab­bages in these small 6″ x 6″ cubes.


Canopy/Water Collection

Over the past cou­ple of weeks Kim Coop­er and I have been cre­at­ing a canopy that can also func­tion to col­lect rain water. We ini­tially met and looked over the site to see how we could take advan­tage of the nat­ural slope and the dif­fer­ent posts and poles already present.

We sketched out some ideas on how to use some of the remain­ing vinyl mate­r­ial from Eric Deis’s pho­to mur­al “Last Chance” to cap­ture and fun­nel the water.


The Vancooper Hen House at the Lab

Dun­can Mar­tin from Back­yard Boun­ty joined us on July 24th to give an infor­mal work­shop on rais­ing hens in your back­yard. He makes these tidy coops out of cedar and wire mesh. They are made to the para­me­ters set out by City of Van­cou­ver bylaws.

The “Van­cooper” was installed at the Lab on the Fri­day before the workshop.


Kale Chips

O.k, so I prob­a­bly plant­ed way too much kale. I was excit­ed about grow­ing it and had no idea just how pro­lific it would be. I was try­ing to get cre­ative about ways to cook and share the kale and I hit upon kale chips. If you haven’t tried them before, I high­ly rec­om­mend this tasty and healthy snack.


Nets

Meaghen Buck­ley cre­ated a series of nets along the rust­ed steel ele­ments on the edge of the Lab. She cro­cheted both nat­ural and syn­thetic fibres into large asym­met­ri­cal shapes cre­at­ing dif­fer­ent ten­sion points in the net which allows for the wind to move freely in and through.


Carlos, AKA The Pallet Guy

Many thanks to Car­los also known as The Pal­let Guy for deliv­er­ing (and unload­ing) 75 pal­lets for the Grow project.


Design Nerds Jam 5.6 Grow

The Grow Design Jam 5.6 brought the Design Nerds and the Grow project togeth­er for some cre­ative, col­lec­tive brain­storm­ing around grow­ing food, col­lect­ing water and com­post­ing at the Bulk­head Lab. Ocean and Ali­cia and I intro­duced the Jam with some infor­ma­tion about the Design Nerds, Grow and a look at some inno­v­a­tive art, design, and archi­tec­ture projects that use liv­ing materials.


Grow | Vancouver Design Nerds Jam

The Design Nerds are team­ing up with Oth­er Sights for Artist’s Projects to bring you this amaz­ing jam. Grow, is focused on cre­at­ing an urban agri­cul­ture lab in South East False Creek. Join us at the Creek­side Com­mu­ni­ty Cen­tre to explore poten­tial plat­forms for grow­ing in post-industrial urban space.


Upcoming Second Workshop May 28th, 2011

Join artist Hol­ly Schmidt, Van­cou­ver Design Nerds, Ocean Dionne, archi­tects, Stephanie Doerk­sen, Anne Mais­soneuve and artist-gardener Lois Klassen for a work­shop explor­ing the pos­si­bil­i­ties for grow­ing food in the urban environment.


Grow Launch

Grow: May 1 – Novem­ber 30 2011

Lead Artist: Hol­ly Schmidt

Oth­er Sights for Artist’s Projects is pleased to present Grow, a pub­lic art project that acts as a pub­lic forum, teach­ing tool and cre­ative lab­o­ra­to­ry for eco­log­i­cal and social sus­tain­abil­i­ty prac­tices in South East False Creek (SEFC), Van­cou­ver, Canada.

Locat­ed in Vancouver’s “green­est devel­op­ment”, the Olympic Vil­lage, Grow explores sus­tain­abil­i­ty issues through a series of walks, work­shops and cre­ative exper­i­ments in urban agri­cul­ture. Walks led by artist, Hol­ly Schmidt and invit­ed guests from archi­tec­ture; design and the human­i­ties focus on the chal­lenges faced by rapid­ly grow­ing and chang­ing cities. Work­shops invite peo­ple to imag­ine new pos­si­bil­i­ties for agri­cul­ture in the city through inven­tive pro­to­type build­ing to sup­port the pro­duc­tion of food in the urban environment.


Micro Gardens for Chain Link Fences

The Grow Work­shops are com­ing up…first one is this Sat­ur­day, May 21st. In prepa­ra­tion, Elisa, cura­to­r­i­al assis­tant with Oth­er Sights, orga­nized a work bee at my stu­dio. She taught us how to cre­ate this easy (rel­a­tive­ly) to fold pock­ets that can be sim­ply attached to a chain link fence and used for growing.


Upcoming Workshop: Saturday, May 21, 2011

Join artist Hol­ly Schmidt, Van­cou­ver Design Nerds, Ocean Dionne and Ali­cia Med­i­na Ladda­ga and a team of mas­ter gar­den­ers for a work­shop explor­ing the pos­si­bil­i­ties for grow­ing food in the urban envi­ron­ment. Through obser­va­tion, dis­cus­sion and hands-on pro­to­type build­ing you will cre­ate and share new ways to grow food in the city. Small pock­et gar­dens will be plant­ed at Creek­side and then sus­pend­ed on chain link fences near the Grow project site. Take a minia­ture gar­den of your own to add some green to your neighbourhood.